Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies: Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants

The Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies seeks to maintain the vitality of China Studies in the US and Canada through fellowships and grants designed primarily for scholars early in their careers.  Studies on and in China have developed over the last 30 years in North America into a robust field, but current conditions pose daunting problems, especially for scholars just before and just after the dissertation.

Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants provide opportunities for scholars of different disciplines to share in-depth investigation of texts that are essential points of entry to Chinese periods, traditions, communities, or events in contemporary or historical times.

This program is made possible by a generous grant from The Henry Luce Foundation.

Read more about this fellowship program.

Please note: affiliations shown are as of time of award. Please click on fellows' names for current information.

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Watch "Emerging Themes and Methods of Research: A Discussion with ACLS Fellows," an annual meeting session featuring recent ACLS fellows. 

  • Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Xu Wei (1521 to 1590)  |  Abstract

    Tina Lu
    Tina Lu

    Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University

  • Letters in Late Song China (1160 to 1270)  |  Abstract

    Beverly J. Bossler
    Beverly J. Bossler

    Professor, History, University of California, Davis

  • Reading, Information, and Quantification in Traditional China  |  Abstract

    Jack W. Chen
    Jack W. Chen

    Associate Professor, Asian Languages & Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles

    Christopher M.B. Nugent
    Christopher M.B. Nugent

    Associate Professor, Williams College

  • Reading, Information, and Quantification in Traditional China  |  Abstract

    Collaborator: Christopher M. B. Nugent, Associate Professor, Department of Asian Studies, Williams College

    Jack W. Chen
    Jack W. Chen

    Associate Professor, Asian Languages & Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles

    Christopher M.B. Nugent
    Christopher M.B. Nugent

    Associate Professor, Williams College

  • The Huayuanzhuang Oracle-bones in Context  |  Abstract

    Roderick B. Campbell
    Roderick B. Campbell

    Assistant Professor, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University